Publications

Publications

This section provides a reverse chronological list of relevant publications authored by the project members, guests, and colleagues, along with abstracts and direct links to the publisher's website.

The list is constantly updated - keep in touch!

Cairns D.L. (2019), "Honour and Kingship in Herodotus: Status, Role, and the Limits of Self-Assertion", Frontiers of Philosophy in China 14.1, 75-93.

The notion of timê (τιμή, normally translated “honour”) is a key concept when it comes to thinking about virtues, roles, and duties in ancient Greek ethics and society, both in popular and in philosophical terms. This discussion concentrates on the work of the fifth-century historian, Herodotus, where the idea of timê as the fulfilment of a specific role in society takes on particular and interesting inflections. In Herodotus, as in Greek generally, timê covers both the esteem that one receives from others and the claim to esteem that the individual him- or herself brings to bear in social interaction. Thus timê is both “deference” and “demeanour” (to use Goffman’s terminology). As a quality of an individual that commands others’ respect, timê also encompasses the roles that are bound up with one’s status. Roles and offices express, attract, and demand timê, but such demands are normally constrained by reciprocal respect for the timê of others. The office of the Persian king, however, appears at first sight to involve unconditional claims to recognition respect, powerful drives towards appraisal respect (in Darwall’s terminology), and only limited acknowledgement of either ethical norms or others claims as potential limitations to regal self-assertion. Closer inspection, however, reveals that the values of mutual respect that underpin the freedom enjoyed by citizens of Greek poleis are also felt by Herodotus to ground claims to freedom and independence on the part of those poleis themselves, claims that the historian’s narrative suggests are ultimately upheld by the gods and embedded in the structure of the cosmos itself.

Keywords: Herodotus, honour, timê, Persian wars, Xerxes

Canevaro M. (2019), "Courage in war and the courage of the war dead - ancient and modern reflections", in M. Giangiulio, E. Franchi, G. Proietti (eds), Commemorating War and War Dead. Ancient and Modern, Stuttgart: Steiner, 187-205.

Recent approaches to ‘courage’ in Athenian democracy and more widely in democratic thought have isolated a notion of ‘democratic’ courage involving rational deliberation and opposed it to more primitive forms of ‘courage’ fueled by shame and typical of ‘honor’ or ‘shame’ cultures. This chapter questions these approaches by stressing the cognitive elements of Homeric and archaic courage and, indeed, shame, and focusing then on Athenian representations of courage, particularly in funeral speeches for the war dead. It stresses the relevance of honor and shame in these representations, isolates the prototypicality of hoplitic courage, and ultimately stresses that far from being primitive, notions of honor and shame were understood as fundamental to values of parrhesia, lawfulness and democratic courage.

The published paper can be accessed here.

Keywords: courage, democracy, Athens, shame, war dead

Cairns D.L. (2019), "Thymos", in OCD, 5th ed., s.v.

Thymos (or thumos), cognate with Indo-European words meaning “smoke,” is one of a number of terms in Greek which associate psychological activity with air and breath. In the Homeric poems, thymos is one of a family of terms associated with internal psychological process of thought, emotion, volition, and motivation. Though the range of the term’s applications in Homer is wide, that in itself gives us a sense of the unity of cognitive, affective, and desiderative processes in Homeric psychology. No post-Homeric author can rival that range, but something of the richness of the Homeric conception of thymos as an interrelated set of motivations re-emerges in Plato’s conception of the tripartite soul in the Republic and the Phaedrus. Plato’s thymos represents a pared-down model of human agency typified by one central desire or aim in life but also exhibiting whatever further capacities of persons are necessary to enable it to pursue that aim in interaction with the other elements of the personality. As in Homer, the metaphorical agency of Plato’s thymos does not detract from the notion of the individual as the real centre of agency. Plato’s conception of thymos, in turn, is a fundamental point of reference for Aristotle’s treatment of thymos as a type of desire (orexis). Though Aristotle tends more generally to use the term as a synonym for orgē (anger), there are also traces of older associations between thymos and qualities such as assertiveness and goodwill towards others. Elsewhere, thymos tends to mean “heart” or “mind” (as aspects of mental functioning), “spirit,” “inclination,” or “anger.” A selection of these uses is surveyed, but the article overall concentrates on Homer, Plato, and Aristotle, where the role of thymos is of a different order of importance.

 

Keywords: thymos, psychology, emotion, anger, Homer, Plato, Aristotle, personification, metaphor

Canevaro M. (2018), "The public charge for hubris against slaves: the honour of the victim and the honour of the hubristēs", JHS 138, 100-126.

This article discusses the rationale and the implications of the inclusion of slaves as victims of punishable hubris in the law about the graphē hubreōs. It argues that hubris against slaves was a punishable offence in Athens not because slaves had institutionally and legally recognized rights or a modicum of honour, but rather because it was hubris, as a disposition to overstep and overestimate one's claims to honour (although manifested in concrete acts), that was deemed unacceptable. The article also investigates the implications of the law for our understanding of the connectedness of ‘legal’ and allegedly ‘extra-legal’ spaces, as well as advocating an understanding of honour that is not necessarily competitive and zero-sum, but also cooperative and aimed at securing smooth social interaction in all spheres of social life.

Canevaro M. (2016), Demostene, "Contro Leptine". Introduzione, Traduzione e Commento Storico, Berlin-Boston: De Gruyter (Texte und Kommentare 55).

The book provides a comprehensive study of Demosthenes’ Against Leptines as a document for the reconstruction of Athenian fourth-century politics, law and public economy. The importance of the speech has been increasingly recognised in recent years, with research on Athenian lawmaking highlighting its centrality and the inadequacy of previous accounts, and work on honours for benefactors and on the liturgical system stressing its importance for understanding the development of the Greek public economy and the conceptualization of euergetism and honour. The introduction and commentary offer a comprehensive treatment of these aspects, providing historians with key insights into Athenians conceptions of public service, public honour and reciprocity. Most importantly for our understanding of Greek honour, this book argues that the Against Leptines provides the first and only comprehensive ancient account of the ideological, theoretical and moral underpinnings of the economy of honour that was so fundamental to the Greek polis, in fostering public service, public honour and reciprocity while cementing the democracy. A large section of the introduction and large parts of the commentary are dedicated to these issues.

Cairns D.L. (2015), "Revenge, punishment, and justice in Athenian homicide law", Journal of Value Inquiry 49.4, 645-665.

This paper forms part of a larger study of emotions of esteem and self-esteem in classical (fifth- and fourth-century) Athenian society. An element of that project focuses on the role of timê (conventionally ‘honour’, but encompassing notions of worth, dignity, prestige, and deference) in Athenian law. This, in turn, requires a consideration of recent controversies regarding the relative importance of personal vengeance versus the punishment of offenders in Athenian litigation. The current paper is an attempt at a test case of manageable scope, using a limited range of primary sources. The aim is to focus on a limited body of evidence, namely the small corpus of extant Athenian forensic speeches that deal with homicide, to see what, if anything, is distinctive about homicide trials in terms of the role that they assign to notions of honour, vengeance, and state-regulated punishment. An important part of this concerns the relation between the affective and the normative in such contexts.

Cairns D.L. (2011), "Honour and shame: modern controversies and ancient values", Critical Quarterly 53.1, 23-41.

This article challenges both the predominant view of honour in Classics (drawn from studies of modern Mediterranean societies) and more recent views of honour as an essentially primitive phenomenon, surviving only in counter-cultural and regressive contexts, building instead on approaches in philosophy, economics, and sociology which see honour as a reflex of an attachment to esteem which permeates all societies at all periods. Concern for honour and shame is not a phenomenon that we should approach from the outside looking in. Though honour-words are clearly attached to different ideals in different societies, and though honour (and its analogues) may take on specific senses at different periods and in different contexts, still there is a general sense in which what mattered to (for example) Homer’s heroes is a reflex of something that still matters to us.

Cairns D.L. (1996), "Hybris, dishonour, and thinking big", JHS 116, 1-32.

The focal point of this article is the detailed study of the concept of hybris published by N.R.E. Fisher (Fisher 1992) and the differences of interpretation which exist between that study and other work on the concept, especially MacDowell 1976. Fisher is right to relate hybris fundamentally to questions of honour; but since honour in Greek has subjective, dispositional aspects and is fundamentally bidirectional and comparative in nature, so hybris also has a substantial dispositional side that Fisher tends to play down.

Cairns D.L. (1993), Aidôs. The Psychology and Ethics of Honour and Shame in Ancient Greek Literature, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

This was the first and is still the only study in English to examine across the range of Greek literature one of the most crucial terms in Greek ethical and social discourse, aidos. Commonly rendered `shame', `modesty', or `respect', aidos is also notoriously one of the most elusive and difficult Greek words to translate. This book discusses the nature and application of aidos and other relevant terms in a number of authors, with particular emphasis on their manifestations in epic, tragedy, and philosophy. It shows that the essence of the concept is to be found in its relationship with Greek values of honour, in which context it can recognize and respond to the honour of both the self and others. It thus involves both self- and other- regarding behaviour, competitive and co-operative values. Despite this crucial relationship with systems of honour, however, the possession of aidos at no stage rules out the sort of commitment to internalized standards or ideals which we might associate with conscience.

 

Featured image: L. Alma-Tadema, The Favourite Poet, 1888 (Lady Lever Art Gallery, Liverpool)

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